July in Review

3pmegamanstyleHey, folks! Welcome to my quick wrap-up of July and what I’ve been up to and writing about over the past 31 or so days.

So what’s been going on in my neck of the woods this month?

Well, in life, it’s been incredibly warm in my area so I’ve spent a lot of time outside and looking for some life improvement while searching for an apartment and generally finding my next direction to travel in. I’ve also entered into year two of the tabletop game that I’ve been running, which has been a bit of an accomplishment for me given the fact that I was terrified of running something like that for friends at all. I’ve also set myself up to try to get more reading done in the future regarding both blogs and literature I’ve been meaning to get to or revisit.

It sounds like a tall order and, to be honest, it is. I suppose working in a direction that I want to be heading toward slowly but surely is better than just expecting everything will fall into place right away, right?

So far as gaming is concerned, I started out the month on a bit of a spree across a bunch of systems, though I’m always working through my Steam backlog and collecting so the pile of games grows ever larger. Before I became hopelessly obsessed with Fire Emblem: Three Houses, I started in on Hyperdimension Neptunia Re;birth 1, a remake of the original game (which I also never played but have heard great things about). I’ve also been looking at some fun platformers and horror games coming up- especially with Man of Medan on the horizon for next month.

It’s been a great time for games, hasn’t it?

20190629155923_1Posts in Review
This month was a pretty horror heavy month, though not without my having finished some games I’ve been meaning to for a while:

Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song (PS2)
Huntsman: The Orphanage – Halloween Edition (PC)
The Ring: Terror’s Realm (Dreamcast)

I also managed to write up a blog post on how games handle protagonists that the player probably shouldn’t empathize with but they should enjoy playing as:

The Frank West Conundrum – Analyzing a Non-Traditional Protagonist

I really enjoy analyzing and discussing these kinds of topics. They’re usually based on conversations I’ve had in passing with gaming friends in person, so bringing them to folks who I get to talk to in the comments here and on Twitter always results in some night insights.

20190706235039_1What’s to Come?
Over the next month, I’m looking forward to updating the couple of overviews I’ve started to include more of the Atelier games and to cover Fire Emblem entries that have released since like Fire Emblem Warriors, Fire Emblem Heroes, and my current obsession, Fire Emblem: Three Houses. I’ve also been working on playing through to do a review and overview of the Left 4 Dead series. I don’t think I’ve played enough first-person shooters or cooperative games lately, so I’d like to branch into that a bit more.

Of course, I’ve also got a review for Dead Rising coming up, along with another game I had been meaning to get through, Castlevania 64. I have a whole host of other games to play through, and I’ve been pretty happy with my balance of PC and console coverage as well as retro and current generation focus, so you can most likely expect more of the same from me upcoming.

Preferably a higher volume of writing, as well- once I finish up with Three Houses, of course.

There are also a lot of you that I would love to support more, and I want to make another post soon showing some love for the folks who have been actively chatting and interacting and some blogs that I’ve been appreciating and frequenting.  I want to stress that there are a lot of folks on here that I appreciate, admire, and support, despite my inability to keep up with all of the amazing content you all produce!

Have a great rest of the week and here’s to a fantastic August!

– Matt (a.k.a. The3rdPlayer)

Weaving a Beautiful and Complex Harmony – Playstation 2 – Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song – 2005

TitlesRomancing SaGa: Minstrel Song
Playstation 2
Square Enix
Genre: Role-Playing
2005

The SaGa series is a lot like the Final Fantasy series in a number of ways. This should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with the golden era of Squaresoft and its catalog given the series’ roots being marketed at first as Final Fantasy Legend on the Game Boy. When game designer Akitoshi Kawazu joined Square and helped in the development in the first two Final Fantasy titles, he may not have specifically known that he was going to end up in charge of directing another one of the company’s longest running series when he was made the director of the Legend series.

Romancing SaGa hit the Super Famicom back in 1992, creating a niche in the role-playing genre that was off-beat enough to stall the series from reaching US shores under this name and with its current mechanics until five years later with SaGa Frontier. After the relative success of that game and its sequel, the company got to work on bridging into the next generation of gaming on the Playstation 2 with two more SaGa titles under the banner- Unlimited SaGa and a title simply known as Romancing SaGa.

Being familiar with the infamous reputation of Unlimited SaGa, I recently decided to turn my attention to Romancing SaGa (with the silent subtitle of Minstrel Song, I assume to discern just a bit further between the PS2 version and the original) as it’s been sitting in my collection for some time. The first time I attempted the game, I was lost. I hadn’t gotten the first idea of how to proceed even having been a fan of SaGa Frontier at the time. I’ve grown a bit since then and have had a lot of exposure to the series; I can’t even begin to describe how excited I am for the release of Romancing SaGa 3 coming to us soon. In my excitement and with new information under my belt regarding how to proceed with the series, I decided to give Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song another whirl. Continue reading

With Honey Comes the Sting – Sega Dreamcast – Blue Stinger – 1999

screenshot_215Blue Stinger
Sega Dreamcast
Climax Graphics/Activision
Genre: Action Adventure
1999

During its launch in the US, Sega’s new Dreamcast console released with 18 games in tow. While that’s not a paltry number for the time, there were only a handful of recognizable titles in the mix like Sonic Adventure and Mortal Kombat Gold. Titles like Soulcalibur and House of the Dead 2 weren’t exactly household titles yet but were familiar to the arcade going crowd. Then, there was a host of games to file under the “unknown” label; intellectual properties that were getting the chance to grow and become new franchises on a sparkly new system.

Blue Stinger is the system’s sole attempt at a straight-up action adventure game from their launch. With the newly formed Climax Graphics at the helm and heavyweight publisher Activision helping the game, it looked to be a formidable attempt at starting a new series in the vein of Dino Crisis and other success stories from the time. I still remember seeing a hefty amount of advertising pushing the game in magazines, and my best friend at the time had grabbed a copy almost immediately because it looked so good.

Unfortunately, I didn’t remember much about playing it aside from the opening scenes when I dove into it recently. As a huge fan of the Dreamcast and its unique library, Blue Stinger is a game I’ve been meaning to take a trip through given its strange existence in the gaming community today- plenty of folks seem not to remember the game exists and those who do have polarizing views on it.

Having dug my heels in to finish it recently, I have my own thoughts on it to share on both how it holds up and regarding its place in gaming at the time. Continue reading

Make Like a Tree and Get Out of Here – Nintendo Entertainment System – Back to the Future – 1989

Back to the Future TitleBack to the Future
Nintendo Entertainment System
Beam Software/LJN
Genre: Run-and-Gun Action
1989

Here we are again. Another film adaptation game on the NES, another trial I have wittingly thrown myself into. I’ve made no secret of my love for the somewhat broken Friday the 13th and my enjoyment of the slightly-more-broken Nightmare on Elm Street. That said, those games are also based off of films that I love. Is it biased to give games leeway because we love the source material? Kind of. I still stand by the idea that Friday the 13th has more to offer than it gets credit for, at the very least.

That said, what happens when a game comes up for a property that you’re ambivalent about? Don’t get me wrong- I really enjoy the Back to the Future films. I didn’t grow up watching them every day or anything, though. In fact, I didn’t watch the entirety of the first film until sometime in my late high school career. I enjoyed it, but it doesn’t have the nostalgia factor that some of my favorites have.

I did, however, have vague memories of playing the game on Nintendo a while ago. My childhood mind had some recollections of near-impossible minigames and something about running down a street. For whatever reason, I decided that I wanted to try to fill in those gaps and go back to play Back to the Future now that I’ve grown a bit and found an appreciation for particular game design choices and gained more of a critical eye for ways older games could be improved on.

I’m sure you can already tell how this went, but let’s push forward and maybe we’ll learn a thing or two along the journey!
Continue reading

Memories, Subjective as They Are – PC – Amnesia: The Dark Descent – 2010

20190315192205_1Amnesia: The Dark Descent
PC
Frictional Games
Genre: Horror Adventure
2010

Everyone finds a different way to tackle their backlog, and it is hardly ever the same as the next person. I’ve worked on finding creative ways to approach my backlog, but it always seems to grow faster than I can get it to shrink. In a recent Twitter post, someone mentioned looking into your Steam library purchases to see what the first game you ever bought on the platform was. My curiosity got the better of me given my pile of games on there is probably the largest of all of my gaming methods, so I took the plunge to find out what my flagship Steam purchase was.

December 11th, 2010. A few days before my birthday so I must have been treating myself. No surprise that it was a horror game but a bit surprising that it was a game I hadn’t played to completion: Amnesia: The Dark Descent. As a bit of a Lovecraft fan and an entrenched horror gaming fan, it struck me as odd that I hadn’t taken the plunge to complete the game but had made a few unsuccessful attempts.

As someone who was very excited to check out Amnesia when it first released, knowing nearly ten years after it came out that I hadn’t finished it became the gasoline in my tank to push into it with the express purpose of seeing the end credits. Not that I didn’t have an inherent interest. After years of hype, though, and seeing it recommended by a ton of fellow horror fans, I had to wonder what kind of impact it would leave on me in the present day. Continue reading