Just Another Brick in the Wall – Game Gear – Sonic the Hedgehog: Triple Trouble – 1994

Screenshot of Sonic the Hedgehog - Triple Trouble (UE)Sonic the Hedgehog: Triple Trouble
Game Gear
Aspect/Sega
Genre: Action Platformer
1994

Growing up on the Sonic games and as an only child, I’m shocked that I didn’t push harder to try to get a Game Gear into my greedy little hands. I do have memories of playing the Game Gear rendition of Sonic the Hedgehog on a friend’s handheld, though- until the battery died. I never saw that Game Gear or game again until years later once I started collecting.

Sonic the Hedgehog: Triple Trouble falls into a strange era of the Sonic franchise. Dropping right into the same timeframe as Sonic 3 and Sonic & Knuckles, the game released in the midst of a time when the flourishing series was expanding its roster and digging its heels into the same league as Mario popularity-wise.

Given that the Game Gear seems to have a fairly limited library and objectively paled in comparison to the Nintendo Game Boy in units sold, it’s sometimes easy to forget how much Sega invested in its potential. Not only is Triple Trouble the third “mainline” Sonic game to be released on the system- it does act as the sequel to equally known Sonic Chaos– but it’s one of nine Sonic related games to be released on it (including games that only released in Japan).

While Super Mario Land and its sequel commonly receive mixed reviews from folks in the current day, I couldn’t help but want to take a step back in time to see if Triple Trouble could stir up those old feelings I got from my original adventures with the spiky blue hedgehog. Given that I haven’t dug into the annals of the Game Gear library yet here on the blog and that this title interested me more than many, this seemed like a suitable place to break ground. Continue reading

A Fiendishly Good Time – Game Boy Color – Revelations: The Demon Slayer – 1999

revelations

Revelations: The Demon Slayer
Game Boy Color
Atlus
© 1992, 1999
Genre: RPG

I have come to love and appreciate the games made by Atlus.  As I mentioned previously, I never used to pay much attention to who made games.  I was introduced to Atlus’ games, and realized I had played through a few of them over the years, including an odd title I’d picked up in my local videogame shop known as Revelations: The Demon Slayer.  Known originally in Japan as Megami Tensai Gaiden: Last Bible, this game may have had one or two biblical references in it to differentiate it from other Dragon Warrior-esque JRPG’s of the day.

Continue reading