Triple The Points for a Second Go – XBox 360 – Dead Rising 2 – 2010

20170719200659_1.jpgDead Rising 2
XBox 360
Blue Castle Games / Capcom
Genre: Action Horror
2010

The Dead Rising series is a group of games that I thoroughly enjoy but don’t get to talk about often. The series is larger than a lot of folks give it credit for at four mainline entries, a number of “side stories” and reimaginings, and a number of films in its mythos. The series has stalled out a bit since its second feature-length movie, Dead Rising: Endgame in 2016 and a re-release of Dead Rising 4 in 2017, but it has a solid foundation of material to sift through for anyone interested in checking it out.

After the success of Dead Rising back in 2006, it seemed to take forever for a second game to follow in its footsteps. When announcements started up in 2009 that another Dead Rising game was on the way, I can remember being pretty excited for some more over-the-top zombie survival using every object I could get my hands on. After three years, it was exciting to think about how far the game could have come from the original, too. The canon ending to the original left plenty of unanswered questions and room for expansion on the plot after all.

Dead Rising 2 had a big set of blood-covered boots to fill, not only from its origins but due to the release of the next entry in Capcom’s heavy hitter series, Resident Evil 5, that came out the same year it was announced. The original game still had some buzz but it was pretty much in bargain bins by the time the second game came around. Promises from the original team, though, showed that the company had faith in their upcoming product. As a fan of the second game from the previous times I’d played it, I wanted to put it under a more critical lens to see if it still held up ten years later. Continue reading

The Scales Always Need to Balance – X-Box 360 – Alan Wake – 2010

20190214182750_1Alan Wake
X-Box 360
Remedy Entertainment/Microsoft Game Studios
Genre: Action Horror
2010

Writers are a very special brand of people. They dream up amazing worlds and characters making their way through gripping situations that resonate with their readers and leave a bit of their own creative blood on the page. The written word has shaped many people in the way they think and what they enjoy thematically among other influences.

Alan Wake is a game that sparked my interest from the get-go. The advertisements touted the main character as a troubled author. Doubled with my love of horror- both in video games and in literature- and I kept an eye on this until it came out. Like most games at the time, however, I had waited until it dropped in price a bit before actually diving in and purchasing.

Growing up reading the likes of Stephen King, John Saul, and Agatha Christie among a number of others, mystery and horror have permeated my media tastes for as long as I can remember. Despite having played through Alan Wake in the past, I found myself drawn to playing it again with a more critical eye. Much like re-reading one of your favorite novels from the past, having a host of life experiences between playthroughs can alter your perceptions and opinions of a game. With nearly ten years having passed since Alan Wake’s release, I was definitely intrigued about whether my views on it would change with another round in the author’s shoes. Continue reading

Memories, Subjective as They Are – PC – Amnesia: The Dark Descent – 2010

20190315192205_1Amnesia: The Dark Descent
PC
Frictional Games
Genre: Horror Adventure
2010

Everyone finds a different way to tackle their backlog, and it is hardly ever the same as the next person. I’ve worked on finding creative ways to approach my backlog, but it always seems to grow faster than I can get it to shrink. In a recent Twitter post, someone mentioned looking into your Steam library purchases to see what the first game you ever bought on the platform was. My curiosity got the better of me given my pile of games on there is probably the largest of all of my gaming methods, so I took the plunge to find out what my flagship Steam purchase was.

December 11th, 2010. A few days before my birthday so I must have been treating myself. No surprise that it was a horror game but a bit surprising that it was a game I hadn’t played to completion: Amnesia: The Dark Descent. As a bit of a Lovecraft fan and an entrenched horror gaming fan, it struck me as odd that I hadn’t taken the plunge to complete the game but had made a few unsuccessful attempts.

As someone who was very excited to check out Amnesia when it first released, knowing nearly ten years after it came out that I hadn’t finished it became the gasoline in my tank to push into it with the express purpose of seeing the end credits. Not that I didn’t have an inherent interest. After years of hype, though, and seeing it recommended by a ton of fellow horror fans, I had to wonder what kind of impact it would leave on me in the present day. Continue reading